Trans-fat food editEdit

«Trans fat, also called unsaturated fatty acids or trans fatty acids, is a type of unsaturated fat that occurs in small amounts in nature,[1] but became widely produced industrially from vegetable fats starting in the 1950s for use in margarine, snack food, packaged baked goods, and for frying fast food.[2][3] Trans fat has been shown to be associated consistently, in an intake-dependent way, with increased risk of coronary artery disease, a leading cause of death in Western nations.[4]

Fats contain long hydrocarbon chains, which can be either unsaturated, i.e., have double bonds, or saturated, i.e., have no double bonds. In nature, unsaturated fatty acids generally have cis as opposed to trans configurations.[5] In food production, liquid cis-unsaturated fats such as vegetable oils are hydrogenated to produce saturated fats, which have more desirable physical properties, e.g., they melt at a desirable temperature (30–40 °C). Partial hydrogenation of the unsaturated fat converts some of the cis double bonds into trans double bonds by an isomerization reaction with the catalyst used for the hydrogenation, which yields a trans fat.[2][3]

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Modified: 8 months ago on Dec 30, 2018
personAlex Inside 23 lvl added it 9 months ago on Dec 15, 2018.